Verb Subject Agreement Errors

Anyone who uses a plural verb with a collective noun must be careful to be precise – and also coherent. This should not be done lightly. The following is the kind of wrong phrase we see and hear these days: The Rule. A singular subject (she, Bill, auto) takes a singular verb (is, goes, shines), while a plural subject takes on a plural verb. In this case, the one who refers to the Father (singular), and thus speaks the verb, is also singular. We will use the standard to highlight themes once and verbs twice. The problem with the phrase is that the verb “are” is a plural form, but is intersected with “One,” a singular name, although “boys” is the next word on the verb in the sentence. The correct answer is: “One of them comes here.” In this case, the verb must be attributed, since each is singular. There are many other sensitive cases, and we will look at them one after the other.

Three deer graze in the backyard. (Subject: three deer) The simple theme of the sentence is “everyone,” so the predicate must be singular instead of the plural. In this sentence, “Each student” is the theme, so we need a unique predicate. The only choice of answers that contains a single predicate for the subject “Each of the students” is “Each of the students was sick last week, so the professor canceled the conference.” Each time you associate two names, you will end up with a plural theme. In such cases, the verb should also be plural: this rule can lead to shocks on the road. For example, if I`m one of the two topics (or more), this could lead to this strange phrase: Bob is a third noun, and the verb (readers) is therefore unique. This harmony between the subject and the verb is called concordance. Once you have identified the verb in a sentence, you can identify the subject by asking yourself a question starting with the words “who” or “what” and the next with the verb. In the sentence “The exhausted rider has crossed the finish line,” you ask yourself: “Who or what crosses?” The runner is the one who crossed paths, so the “runner” is the subject of the sentence. Sometimes the subject of a sentence is more than a word. “The way she won surprised her,” is an example. The subject is identified by the same method.

The “what” that surprised is “The way she won,” the theme of the phrase. Subject-verbal chord errors occur when the scribe or spokesman uses the plural form of a verb, when the subject calls the singular form, or when the singular form of a verb is used, then the subject calls the plural form.

Comments are closed.